The Immediate Carryover Effects of Peroneal Functional Electrical Stimulation Differ between People with and without Chronic Ankle Instability

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Abstract

Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a common condition that may develop after an ankle sprain. Compared with healthy individuals, those with CAI demonstrate excessive ankle inversion and increased peroneal electromyography (EMG) activity throughout the stance phase of gait, which may put them at greater risk for re-injury. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of targeted muscles may provide benefits as a treatment modality to stimulate immediate adaptation of the neuromuscular system. The present study investigated the effect of a single, 10 min peroneal FES session on ankle kinematics and peroneal EMG activity in individuals with (n = 24) or without (n = 24) CAI. There were no significant differences in ankle kinematics between the groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, healthy controls demonstrated significantly less ankle inversion between 0–9% (p = 0.009) and 82–87% (p = 0.011) of the stance phase. Furthermore, a significant within-group difference was observed only in the control group, demonstrating increased ankle eversion between 0–7% (p = 0.011) and 67–81% (p = 0.006) of the stance phase after the intervention. Peroneal EMG activity did not differ between groups or measurements. These findings, which demonstrate that peroneal FES can induce ankle kinematics adaptations during gait, can help to develop future interventions for people with CAI.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1622
JournalSensors
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Chronic ankle instability
  • Functional electrical stimulation
  • Gait analysis
  • Kinematics
  • Statistical parametric mapping

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