The effects of mannitol diuresis on digoxin and phenobarbital handling by the kidney: implications for tubular reabsorption and secretion of the cardiac glycoside

G. Koren, J. Klein, Y. Bentur, E. Giesbrecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of mannitol diuresis on the renal clearance of digoxin and phenobarbital was studied in dogs. Mannitol diuresis significantly increased the clearance of digoxin and the ratio digoxin: inulin clearances (from 0.7 ± 0.2 to 1.1 ± 0.25). The increase in phenobarbital:inulin clearance ratio was significantly higher than the increase in the digoxin:inulin clearance ratio (4.9 fold vs 1.66 fold) (p < 0.005). Mannitol diuresis did not significantly affect inulin clearance, nor digoxin protein binding during the experimental period while there was a significant increase in PAH clearance. Significant correlations were found between urine flow rate and digoxin renal clearance or digoxin:inulin clearance ratio. The increase in the ratio drug:inulin clearance with diuresis correlated inversely with the initial ratio; animals with more predominant net reabsorption had a higher increase in ratio. These studies suggest that the mannitol-induced increase in digoxin clearance stems from a combination of increased renal blood flow enhancing digoxin secretion, and increased urine flow rate inhibiting its reabsorption. We conclude that urine flow rate and renal blood flow are important determinants of the renal clearance of digoxin, independent of GFR. Any study assessing the effect of pathophysiological states or drug interactions on digoxin renal clearance must control for these factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-284
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Investigative Medicine
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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