The brain’s asymmetric frequency tuning: Asymmetric behavior originates from asymmetric perception

Arianna Felisatti, David Aagten-Murphy, Jochen Laubrock, Samuel Shaki, Martin H. Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

To construct a coherent multi-modal percept, vertebrate brains extract low-level features (such as spatial and temporal frequencies) from incoming sensory signals. However, because frequency processing is lateralized with the right hemisphere favouring low frequencies while the left favours higher frequencies, this introduces asymmetries between the hemispheres. Here, we describe how this lateralization shapes the development of several cognitive domains, ranging from visuo-spatial and numerical cognition to language, social cognition, and even aesthetic appreciation, and leads to the emergence of asymmetries in behaviour. We discuss the neuropsychological and educational implications of these emergent asymmetries and suggest future research approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2083
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalSymmetry
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Asymmetry
  • Embodied cognition
  • Global/local
  • Spatial frequencies
  • Temporal frequencies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The brain’s asymmetric frequency tuning: Asymmetric behavior originates from asymmetric perception'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this