Structural phenomenon based theoretical model of concrete tensile behavior at different stress-strain conditions

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Abstract

Research focused on concrete tensile strength is rather limited compared to that of compressive strength. In most cases concrete tensile strength is neglected in design, but in special cases (gas holders, tankers, nuclear plants, big diameter pipes, etc.) this strength is dominant. Although research related to concrete tensile strength has increased in the last decade, concrete tensile behavior at all stress-strain conditions has yet to be properly investigated. Therefore, additional attempts are required for proposing a methodology that enables more accurate consideration of tensile strength in structural design. In the present study, a structural phenomenon is used to develop a theoretical model of concrete tensile behavior at different stress-strain conditions. A classification of concrete tensile stress is proposed. Two groups of tension are defined – direct and indirect. The differences between indirect and direct concrete tensile strength are investigated. This study is aimed at conducting a detailed complex analysis of concrete tensile behavior that should provide concrete strength and strain characteristics for each type of tensile stress at elastic, elastic-plastic, and ultimate limit states. As a result, using empirical coefficients for analysis of concrete resistance in tension is avoided. The proposed methodology can be used for updating the existing codes for more accurate design of reinforced concrete elements.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101594
JournalJournal of Building Engineering
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Concrete tensile behavior
  • Concrete tensile characteristics at different stress
  • Direct tension
  • Indirect tension
  • Strain conditions
  • Tension classification

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