Social Support Moderates the Relationship Between Death Anxiety and Psychological Distress Among Israeli Nurses

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18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based on the stress-buffering model, the current study sought to examine the moderating role of perceived social support in the association between death anxiety and psychological distress among nurses. Select variables found in previous studies to correlate with psychological distress served in the current study as covariates to control for their relationship with psychological distress among nurses. These include gender, years of professional experience, self-rated health, self-efficacy, and self-defined burnout. Structured questionnaires were administered to a sample of 795 professionally active nurses in Israel. Psychological distress was assessed by the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6), death anxiety was assessed by a single item scale designed by Abdel-Khalek, and perceived social support was assessed by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). The research findings show that higher levels of death anxiety were associated with higher levels of psychological distress only among nurses with lower levels of perceived social support. The study indicates that in order to reduce the level of distress experienced by nurses it is important to take action to reduce their death anxiety and enhance their social support mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1502-1514
Number of pages13
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume124
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • death
  • nurses
  • psychological distress
  • social support

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