Selenoprotein P in a Rodent Model of Exercise; Theorizing Its Interaction with Brain Reward Dysregulation, Addictive Behavior, and Aging

Patrick Mohr, Colin Hanna, Aidan Powell, Samantha Penman, Kenneth Blum, Alireza Sharafshah, Kai Uwe Lewandrowski, Rajendra D. Badgaiyan, Abdalla Bowirrat, Albert Pinhasov, Panayotis K. Thanos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exercise promotes health and wellness, including its operation as a protective factor against a variety of psychological, neurological, and chronic diseases. Selenium and its biomarker, selenoprotein P (SEPP1), have been implicated in health, including cancer prevention, neurological function, and dopamine signaling. SEPP1 blood serum levels were compared with a one-way ANOVA between sedentary (SED), moderately exercised (MOD) [10 m/min starting at 10 min, increasing to 60 min], and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) exercised rats [30 min in intervals of 2-min followed by a 1-min break, speed progressively increased from 10 to 21 m/min]. HIIT rats showed significantly higher serum SEPP1 concentrations compared to MOD and SED. More specifically, HIIT exercise showed an 84% increase in SEPP1 levels compared to sedentary controls. MOD rats had greater serum SEPP1 concentrations compared to SED, a 33% increase. The results indicated that increased exercise intensity increases SEPP1 levels. Exercise-induced increases in SEPP1 may indicate an adaptive response to the heightened oxidative stress. Previous studies found a significant increase in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) binding in these same rats, suggesting a potential association between SEPP1 and dopamine signaling during exercise. Modulating antioxidants like SEPP1 through personalized therapies, including exercise, has broad implications for health, disease, and addiction.

Original languageEnglish
Article number489
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2024

Keywords

  • SEPP1
  • aerobic exercise
  • rat
  • selenoprotein P

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