Psychological distress and perceived job stressors among hospital nurses and physicians during the COVID-19 outbreak

Liat Hamama, Ibtisam Marey-Sarwan, Yaira Hamama-Raz, Bothaina Nakad, Ahamd Asadi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: The study examined self-reported job-related stressors induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and psychological distress among hospital nurses and physicians. In addition, we explored the role of negative affect (NA) and background variables in relation to COVID-19-related job stressors and psychological distress. Background: During COVID-19 pandemic, hospital nurses and physicians were exposed to highly enduring occupational stress, that stem from subjective appraisal of inadequate job resources (i.e., personal protection equipment, information on how to manage safely in the ongoing work and organizational attention to the needs arising from the ongoing work). Design: Cross-sectional design. Methods: Between May and July 2020, 172 nurses and physicians working at a medical centre in Israel filled in self-report questionnaires about sociodemographic data, COVID-19-related job stressors, psychological distress and NA. Results: Our results confirmed the positive direct link between perceived COVID-19-related job stressors and psychological distress among hospital nurses and physicians. NA was found to serve as a mediator in this association (indirect link). Furthermore, nurses and physicians' seniority was related positively to psychological distress and also played a moderator role in the indirect link. Conclusion: We recommend to monitor the mental health of hospital nurses and physicians and to provide a platform to address their job stressor concerns related to COVID-19, and share helpful coping strategies. Impact statement: During the abrupt COVID-19 outbreak, hospital nurses and physicians face challenges that might raise NA and psychological distress. Our study revealed that among hospital nurses and physicians, COVID-19-related perceived job stressors and psychological distress were positively linked, and NA plays a mediating role in this association. Among nurses and physicians with moderate or high years of seniority (>11 years), higher COVID-19-related perceived job stressors associated with higher NA, which in turn was associated with greater psychological distress. Policymakers would be wise to provide a platform to address hospital nurses and physicians' mental health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1642-1652
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • job-related stressors
  • negative affect
  • nurses
  • physicians
  • psychological distress
  • seniority

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