Optically derived metabolic and hemodynamic parameters predict hippocampal neurogenesis in the BTBR mouse model of autism

David Abookasis, Danit Lerman, Hava Roth, Matanel Tfilin, Gadi Turgeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we made use of dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) to assess cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the BTBR-genetic mouse model of autism spectrum disorder, as well as control (C57Bl/6J) mice. Since the deficits in social behavior demonstrated by BTBR mice are attributed to changes in neural tissue structure and function, we postulated that these changes can be detected optically using DW-LSI. BTBR mice demonstrated reductions in both CBF and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2), as suggested by studies using conventional neuroimaging technologies to reflect impaired neuronal activation and cognitive function. To validate the monitoring of CBF by DW-LSI, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were also performed which confirmed the lowered CBF in the autistic-like group. Furthermore, we found in vivo cortical CBF measurements to predict the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis, measured ex vivo by the number of neurons expressing doublecortin or the cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 in the dentate gyrus, with a strong positive correlation between CBF and neurogenesis markers (Pearson, r = 0.78; 0.9, respectively). These novel findings identifying cortical CBF as a predictive parameter of hippocampal neurogenesis highlight the power and flexibility of the DW-LSI and LDF setups for studying neurogenesis trends under normal and pathological conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere201600322
JournalJournal of Biophotonics
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • autism
  • blood flow
  • brain metabolism
  • cerebral hemodynamics
  • laser Doppler flowmetry
  • laser speckle imaging
  • neurogenesis

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