Going immersive in a community of learners? Assessment of design processes in a multi-setting architecture studio

Hadas Sopher, Dafna Fisher Gewirtzman, Yehuda E. Kalay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Future learning spaces (FLSs), such as immersive virtual environments, have expanded the architectural studio beyond traditional spaces, offering new affordances for learning communities (LCs) to enculturate design practices. These developments raise a need to assess how different spaces foster intended learning activities. In response, we developed a model to assess the way (LCs) are supported during the design process. Our model aggregates learners' design decisions, along with their physical, virtual and social settings, into units called knowledge construction activities. These are then linked with subsequent units, to create design development graphs. The model was applied to two studio courses that used a conventional classroom and a technology-enhanced immersive FLS. Analyses show that each space supported different learning activities. Notably, the immersive FLS was shown to support design convergence, considered to be an essential skill. While advancing concepts related to design pedagogy, the model can support additional designers of FLS for (LCs) when integrating multiple spaces. Practitioner Notes What is already known about this topic Future Learning Spaces (FLSs), such as immersive virtual environments (IVEs), have expanded the architectural studio beyond traditional spaces, offering new affordances for design learning communities to enculturate expert design practices. IVEs are known to support spatial perception and enhance design flow, suitable for constructing design knowledge. Studio assessments mostly focus on learners' final outcomes and learner–teacher communication. What this paper adds New knowledge about how an immersive FLS can foster the emergence of design learning communities. An analytical toolkit to measure the way IVEs affect the enculturation of design skills, particularly in divergent and convergent activities. A comprehensive method to map design learning processes and analyze learning progress. Implications for practice and/or policy The educational sector can use this model to evaluate the way technology-enhanced learning spaces for learning communities meet given educational goals. The education community can use this method as a powerful and efficient tool to design multiple-setting courses and develop teaching strategies to support learning communities in FLSs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2109-2128
Number of pages20
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Technology
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

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