Exposure to Macrolides During Pregnancy and the Risk for Spontaneous Abortions: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Shani Hegger, Amalia Levy, Gideon Koren, Eitan Lunenfeld, Sharon Daniel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies evaluating the risk of spontaneous abortions following exposure to macrolides reported controversial results. The goal of the current study was to examine the risk for spontaneous abortions following exposure to macrolides during pregnancy. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study by linking three computerized databases: Clalit Health Services drug dispensation database, Soroka Medical Center (SMC) birth database, and SMC hospitalizations database. Multivariate time-varying Cox regressions were performed and adjusted for suspected confounders and known risk factors for spontaneous abortions. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A secondary analysis was performed to assess the association between exposure to macrolides in terms of the defined daily dose dispensed and spontaneous abortions. The study cohort included 65,457 pregnancies that ended at Soroka Medical Center between 2004 and 2009, of which 6508 (9.9%) resulted in a spontaneous abortion. A total of 825 (1.26%) pregnancies were exposed to macrolides during the exposure period. Exposure to macrolides was not associated with spontaneous abortions as a group (adjusted HR 1.00 95% CI 0.77-1.31) or as specific medications. There was no evidence of a dose-response relationship between exposure to macrolides and spontaneous abortions. In conclusion, this population-based retrospective cohort study did not detect an increased risk for spontaneous abortion following exposure to macrolides during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • drug safety
  • drugs in pregnancy
  • macrolides
  • spontaneous abortion

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