Effects of music tempo on perceived exertion, attention, affect, heart rate, and performance during isometric strength exercise

Robyn Feiss, Jason Kostrna, James W. Scruggs, Melissa Pangelinan, Gershon Tenenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effects of slow and fast music tempi on effort-related thoughts, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affect, heart rate, and performance during isometric strength exercises. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (no-music control, fast-tempo music, and slow-tempo music) and performed two isometric strength exercises (wall-sit and plank). RPE, attention allocation, and affect were measured during each exercise task. Participants in both the fast- and slow-tempo music conditions maintained a dissociative state for longer than those in the no-music control condition during the wall-sit exercise; however, this effect did not manifest during the plank exercise. Neither music condition influenced HR, RPE, time to volitional exhaustion, or affect. Within the first few minutes of exercise, participants exhibited an increase in HR and perceived exertion, as well as a corresponding shift towards associative attention and a high arousal state. The results are discussed with reference to potential underlying mechanisms and current theories pertaining to RPE, attention allocation, and affect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-169
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • fatigue
  • performance
  • psychology
  • strength

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