Dynamic Neuro-Cognitive Imagery (DNI™) improves developpé performance, kinematics, and mental imagery ability in university-level dance students

Amit Abraham, Rebecca Gose, Ron Schindler, Bethany H. Nelson, Madeleine E. Hackney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dance requires optimal range-of-motion and cognitive abilities. Mental imagery is a recommended, yet under-researched, training method for enhancing both of these. This study investigated the effect of Dynamic Neuro-Cognitive Imagery (DNI™) training on developpé performance (measured by gesturing ankle height and self-reported observations) and kinematics (measured by hip and pelvic range-of-motion), as well as on dance imagery abilities. Thirty-four university-level dance students (M age = 19.70 ± 1.57) were measured performing three developpé tasks (i.e., 4 repetitions, 8 consecutive seconds hold, and single repetition) at three time-points (2 × pre-, 1 × post-intervention). Data were collected using three-dimensional motion capture, mental imagery questionnaires, and subjective reports. Following the DNI™ intervention, significant increases (p < 0.01) were detected in gesturing ankle height, as well as in hip flexion and abduction range-of-motion, without significant changes in pelvic alignment. These gains were accompanied by self-reported decrease (p < 0.05) in level of difficulty experienced and significant improvements in kinesthetic (p < 0.05) and dance (p < 0.01) imagery abilities. This study provides evidence for the motor and non-motor benefits of DNI™ training in university-level dance students.

Original languageEnglish
Article number382
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
Issue numberMAR
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dance
  • Developpé
  • Dynamic neuro-cognitive imagery
  • Kinematics
  • Mental imagery
  • Range-of-motion
  • Training

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