Cold plasma hydrophilization of soy protein isolate and milk protein concentrate enables manufacturing of surfactant-free water suspensions. Part I: Hydrophilization of food powders using cold plasma

Edward Bormashenko, Yelena Bormashenko, Irina Legchenkova, Necla Mine Eren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we found that treatment with cold plasma influenced the wetting properties of soy protein isolate and milk protein concentrate powders. Cold plasma treatment significantly decreased the apparent contact angle of the powders, indicating hydrophilization of the powders. Cold radiofrequency low-pressure plasma treatment had a larger effect on powder wettability than corona atmospheric plasma discharge. In addition, cold plasma treatment had a more noticeable effect on the wettability of the hydrophobic milk protein concentrate than on the inherently hydrophilic soy protein isolate. Both the soy protein isolate and milk protein concentrate demonstrated zero hydrophobic recovery over time. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cold air plasma treatment of food powders caused minor surface oxidation, though these changes were not observed using FTIR spectroscopy. We suggest that cold plasma treatment has important implications for the production of stabilizer-free food suspensions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102759
JournalInnovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies
Volume72
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Cold plasma treatment
  • Hydrophilization
  • Milk protein concentrate
  • Oxidation
  • Soy protein isolate

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