Adherence to a Mediterranean diet by vegetarians and vegans as compared to omnivores

Kerem Avital, Assaf Buch, Idan Hollander, Tzori Brickner, Uri Goldbourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

To assess adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedD) by vegetarians and vegans compared to omnivores, we recruited an internet-based convenience sample of 565, 151 and 514 Israeli (>20 years) vegans, vegetarians and omnivores. Studies assessing vegetarians’ and vegans’ adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedD) are scarce. We recruited an internet-based convenience sample of 565, 151 and 514 Israeli vegans, vegetarians and omnivores, mostly female with a normal weight. We assessed their MedD scores (MedDS) and their food groups’ consumption by two food frequency questionnaires: (1) Trichopoulou’s MedDS (range 0–9); (2) Literature-based MedDS (LBMedDS) (range 0–18). We found that vegans tend to consume significantly more legumes, nuts, fruits and vegetables than omnivores. The multivariable-adjusted odds for high MedDS (a score ≥4) (compared to omnivores) assessed by Trichopoulou’s score were: 32.35-fold higher in vegans (95% CI, 21.43–48.84) and 3.13-fold higher in vegetarians (95% CI, 2.06–4.76). Using the LBMedDS, vegans had 2.30-fold higher odds for high MedD adherence (a score ≥12) and vegetarians 1.66-fold higher odds compared to omnivores. In conclusion, we found a higher MedD adherence among vegans and vegetarians compared to omnivores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378-387
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mediterranean diet
  • food patterns
  • vegan diet
  • vegetarian diet

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